About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 251
LANGUAGE
English 251
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 251 (some duplicates have been removed)
at 9:15, the impact of new leadership in china on u.s. relations. president obama traveling in parts of asia. we will have those segments, plus, we will take a look at the papers and take your phone calls as well "washington journal ."shington, we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next, a discussion on the future of u.s. diplomacy. after that, a forum on the effectiveness of al-qaeda in yemen. >> a former state department officials from the obama and george w. bush administration's discuss public diplomacy in a tough budget in vermont. the discuss the effectiveness of student exchange programs and government-backed broadcasting outlets, like "voice of america." the george washington school of international affairs hosted this event tuesday. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> that is public diplomacy in action. [laughter] i'm a professor here at gw and the director of the institute for public policy and global communication. you can find us on twitter @ip dgc. we're also on fa
generations calling us apathetic, spoon-fed and directionless, and i went away feeling inspired that our generation, you know, does want to fix this country, does want to fix this world. i don't know if it is going to happen overnight. our world is changing every day. i think the way we communicate, the way we affect change is doing different things. my father and mother who grew up in the 1960's, we are not out there in the streets protesting. we spread information and communication in a much different way. >> where did you grow up? >> i was born in d.c., i grew up in connecticut, went to school in new hampshire. >> what was the atmosphere in your family? what did your parents do? >> my mother was a journalist, she was a science writer. she wrote for the washington post for a number of years. >> what was her name? >> christine heineman. my father worked for general electric, and he now teaches up in boston. >> wasn't his father also well known? i learned this from you, but thousand how did they fit into the path? >> my parents and grandparents are amazing people. i feel very lucky. >> w
in budget talks. here are the numbers to call. if you can also find us online. here is the headline in "the new york times." the pew center has a new study out called "the impact on the fiscal cliff on states." here is what it says. we would do more into these and how they will specifically affect states on an individual basis. there is a question on whether the fiscal cliff would hurt. it says -- our question for you this morning is whether the states should have a stake of in negotiations. looking more in the story "the new york times." it says -- some of the benefits states could receive, nobody is retained that president obama and republicans in congress will fail to reach an accord because they feel -- they fear that the resulting combination of spending cuts and tax increases could prompt another recession, which their states can ill afford. let's go to houston, texas and hear from barry. caller: high. host: am i:should sit seven role in the negotiations? we are hearing about how republicans and president obama are negotiating. caller: i think the democrats should have some form of a
us and it gives us more government that's inefficient and doesn't work very well. it gives us the possibility of even higher taxes. and there's a lot of reasons i hate higher taxes, the biggest reason is i know where that money goes in that city and it's time to clean it up down there. the last thing we need is higher taxes and regulators. instead of embracing the people that give people opportunity for jobs, they pound on us, they pound on small business people and stunt our growth. but we have another choice here tonight. and that's why there is so many people here tonight. you know it's about that american dream. you know government is not the answer. government is the last resort and not a first resort. and we know we're stronger when we run america from the bottom up. when people have more money in their pocket. when families have more wealth and people get jobs. and the greatest issue in america today is jobs. and the reason is mom and dad are working, the family is stronger t children are stronger. it all works for a stronger america and stronger communities. that is wh
looked at it in a journalism lands, it has seemed to us, and this will probably offend most of you, but to be higher at to touche -- the higher education institutions have not covered themselves in glory. the enrollment and a financial aid of people are not being very strict because they want to enroll people with what the costs are really going to be and what the alternatives might be of coming to their wonderful places. what it means to take out a loan and how much is reasonable for a person to borrow. it is true that this is a matter of public choice, really. people have the right to make the choices they want. but i want to hear from you all whether there is more you think the university should be doing without stepping on people's right to send their kids to whatever school they think their kids should go to. is there more you all could and should be doing to help guide those choices and make it less about enrolling everybody in your institution? anybody who wants to talk should. >> i think a lot of the public outrage is what is happening in private higher education, not publi
to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they
for coming and spending time with us. it does not matter what you did tonight if you do not get out and vote november 6. thank you for watching. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> our live road to the white house coverage continues tonight. first, at a 20 5:00 p.m. eastern, republican candidate mitt romney and his -- at 8:25 p.m. eastern, a republican candidate mitt romney and his wife at a rally. then, at 10:35 p.m. eastern, obama and bill clinton attend a rally. >> now joining us on the communicators this weekend before the election is fcc commissioner mimi on cyberporn mignon cyburn. if we could start with the events of the week. cellphone towers have been knocked out. people are using pay phones because their service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in the area? >> first of a, allow me to thank you for allowing me to be here today. my condolences go out to the families. many of loved ones were lost in this tragic event. my condolen
for joining us on this sunday. enjoy the rest of your weekend. have a great day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> watched the presidential election results tuesday night. next, "newsmakers" with debbie wasserman schulz the democratic national committee chair. then mitt romney campaigned in colorado. >> on of the tonight we're going to see a pretty consistent pattern. it is like to start in virginia were the polls close at 7:00. that is a contested battleground state. the polls are showing a relatively tight race. the accounting votes. if we know that virginia is swinging pretty dramatically one way or another toward president obama or more romney or one of the senate candidates, we're going to have a pretty good idea of what the rest of the net will look for. keep an eye on virginia. that is a bellwether. in a macro sense, what we're going to see is the first normal data point we have seen in eight years. the 2006 cycle was a democratic way. the 2010 cycle was a republican wave tha. we've not seen a norm
clear yesterday that he is open to new ideas. the u.s. cannot afford tax cuts that were passed 10 years ago -- over 10 years ago now. he feels that the most fair way to pick our revenue shortfall is by raising revenue from the very top. >> explained to everyone, if you can. under balsams and, it was predicted that we have -- bowl es-simpson, it was predicted that we would have 16 trillion dollars. even if you have that, why is that ok to have 22 trillion dollars of debt at in 10 years? by the is that considered still a good thing to do? -- why is that considered still a good thing to do it? >> the best capacity is the size of the debt relative to the economy. what the president has proposed is to put us on a path where the debt is stabilized and we are coming down relative to gdp. >> it is still 100% of gdp. >> i would explain a little bit about the numbers. that is the 16 trillion dollar figure that you mentioned earlier. i do nothing that is inappropriate way of measuring our debt. it is not the measure of that that is economic relevant. >> ten or 12? >> closer to 12. >> ok. the unemp
. >> aida donald author of "citizen soldier, a life of harry s. truman." delighted to have you with us. >> thank you for inviting me. it has been a delight. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> tomorrow on "washington journal", david walker talks about his ideas for averting the fiscal cliff, followed by a look at u.s. oil production and a new report that the international energy agency about the country's energy production by 2020. later, we will talk about how the federal bureau of investigation and the cyber- based crimes. clark sought foreign policy scholars will discuss the relationship of the u.s. with china. we will hear from the u.s. ambassador to china. our live coverage begins tomorrow at 9:15 on c-span2. >> the mindset of the world, was into the mid 1990's that wire line access would -- with stuff on poles or in the ground was the key to understanding telecommunications. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very few people inside the industry - back- that is why the report came out the
the panel and we'll see you the reception. >> next a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceil
for being with us. >> joining us is david levinthal, a reporter for politico. thank you for being with us. let me begin by asking about florida. you said the president will win your state. breakdown the demographics of florida. where will the president do well and mitt romney? >> let's just talk about how early voting has been going. you do that combined with the absentee voting. going into early voting, we cut the absentee ballots by 85%. going in they had about 36,000 ballots when normally they have more than 200,000 ballots more than us. when early voting ended yesterday we had 104 more democrats that have cashed out. -- 104,000 more that have cast ballots. we have run circles around them because of our very strong and ground game. there has been an explosive turnout of democrats in major counties. yesterday we had single day records and major counties around the state of florida. going into election day weekend see in my state that the enthusiasm is explosive among democratic voters were turned out in record numbers to support president obama. the same is true in states across the cou
in this morning two-way end. -- two ways. you can tweet us or send an email. we invite you to check out our facebook page. the headlines for this meeting yesterday reflect the same type of town seen in the washington post this morning. a picture of president obama and john boehner. the upbeat tone was a dramatic shift from recent years when the president and a gop fortified by anti-government activists clashed repeatedly over spending and taxes. if he were to go to yesterday's new york times, they have a listening are at least pictures of the key leaders that will be involved in this process. to show you where they stand specifically on some issues, here is the president saying he will reject any bill that extends tax cuts for the wealthy. here is john boehner who has said raising tax rates is unacceptable and a new revenue should be generated by economic growth spurred by a simpler tax code and that closes loopholes and and deductions. there are some other leaders involved in this project. what do you think they will be able to do to keep the fiscal cliff from happening by the end of the y
before when the early voting numbers look good for us. >> you thought it long before the election. i know that. [laughter] >> but i was pretty sure -- >> how long? could he have one after the first debate or where the forces in motion? >> sure, absolutely he could have one. -- won. it was competitive the entire way. i think governor romney could have one up until the end. i always believe in the fundamental truth, we were building the best grass roots campaign in modern political history. we had the best candidate and the best message. >> in a way, the story of this election is the degree to which replicated the 2008 results. many people thought that 2008 was a once-in-a-lifetime result. you came very close to replicating it. i think the most fascinating statistic is african-americans in ohio, 11% of the electorate, 15% this time. you found 200,000 more african- american voters who turned out for you. mitt romney lost the state by 103,000. that was the election, right there. finding those extra african american voters. >> let me back up. we won this election because of barack obama. peopl
commander in iraq. talking about the changing structure of the u.s. army. that's set to start at about 10:30 eastern here on c-span. just a short while ago, president obama farthered the white house this morning on his way to wisconsin with just a few days until the election, the president is returning to the campaign trail after placing his campaign on hold for the past few days to manage the federal response to hurricane sandy. the president holds a rally in green bay, wisconsin, this morning before heading west for an eempt later today in las vegas. you can watch both those events live on line at c-span.org. tonight at 9:00 eastern, the president will be speaking to supporters at the university of colorado in boulderment you can watch that live right here on c-span. mitt romney is campaigning throughout virginia today. he'll be in roanoke, virginia beach, and this afternoon in doswell just outside richmond. c-span will have live coverage of that stop beginning about 2:15. also live a rally with mitt romney's wife ann. that will be at noon eastern. she's speaking with supporters in colu
,000 a year, your number is 202-585-3882. and if you're making under $50,000 a year, give us a call at 202-585-3883. we'll have those numbers up on the screen. basically $250,000, $100,000 to $250,000, $50,000 to $100,000, and under $50,000. social media, the addresses are twitter, @cspanwj, facebook.com/cspan, or send us an email to journal@c-span.org. this is more of what was in "the new york daily news" by joseph straw -- host: we want to take a look at what the president had to say yesterday, speaking yesterday. the president again said those making over $250,000 a year should pay more taxes and said a deal extending tax cuts for the middle class should happen immediately. >> already i put forward a detailed plan that allows us to make these investments while reducing our deficit by $4 trillion over the next decade. i want to be clear. i'm not wedded to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class fam
facilities are so far in the ground that israel does not producing a satisfactory assault. they would need u.s. plant emissions to carry some of those weapons. perhaps that might give some hope there would be communication, if there is an attack down the line, that the two countries would be to work together and cordray. host: 3 more, go to foreignpolicy.com. thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. we will be back live tomorrow morning but lawmakers make their way back for the lame-duck session that begins today. we will be up there taking your calls and your comments and questions. thank you for watching today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> on the c-span networks, getting under way momentarily on c-span 3, symposium on the so- called fiscal cliff including automatic tax hikes and spending cuts unless congress acts by the end of the year. it is hosted by the new america foundation. right now, a discussion on yemen and the fight against al qaeda just
is a prolific and wonderful leader. host: thank you so much for joining us today. that is our show for the "washington journal." we will take you now live to the house floor. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. we come to the end of a week during which some members of this people's house have come to complete their service in the congress and others have come to prepare for their opportunity to serve this great nation. it is a time of tremendous transition, a time thought with trendation and some uncertainty. send your spirit of peace and calm, let all might have confidence in your faithfulness to us and no matter what lies ahead, your grace is abundantly available. now we approach a week during which all americans will regather to remember who we are , a nation generously blessed not only by you, our god, but by courageous ancestors, faithful allies and the best good wishes of people everywher
you do instead of dealing with the policy issues. we have have a very distinguished member with us, a good friend of all of us, someone who deals seriously with policy issues and is joined us today and that would be january from illinois. >> also i think today of most significance i believe is my role on the intelligence committee. all of us were given a briefing based on emerging information from the intelligence committee . susan rice, i do -- susan rice went on television based on the information that was available at the time and the briefing that she was given information and intelligence that she had no part in collecting. the kind of statement that is anyone who had been given those briefings would have made in public. obviously, this was on an unclassified buys sis but she was given information that she had that has subsequently been updated. it was not wrong or deliberately misleading in any way. there had been the belief that there had been a protest that developed into this attack. so susan rice as the president very clearly said, if anyone has a problem with the intelli
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures within the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >> this weekend on c-span3, 49 years later, the questions remain. lone gunman, the mob, the cia, castro. what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> it was in 1982 that judge harold greene issued a decision which led to the breakup of the at&t corp.. that is our topic this week on the "communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on the telecommunications. joining us is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit, both of whom were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us in the washington studio is paul. professor noll, first of all, what with your activity during the breakup of at&t and what led to that decision? >> the antitrust case was formed during the johnson administration the late 1960's and a presidential task force called the telecommunications policy task force. it concluded the telecommunications industry, the part in federal
author of "citizen soldier, a life of harry s. truman." delighted to have you with us. >> thank you for inviting me. it has been a delight. >> tonight, of british prime minister david cameron attends the banquet, followed by marco rubio in iowa, and later eric holder talk about the recent the peace settlement. -- the recent bp settlement. we will discuss economic challenges of the country prepares for transition. we will hear from the u.s. ambassador to china. our live coverage begins tomorrow on c-span 2. we will look at immigration policy at the american enterprise institute. speakers include utah's's attorney general. then the ceo of the nasdaq stock exchange talks about the so- called sysco close and its effect on capital markets. that is at 1:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow night, the former abc anchor ted koppel, talks about the future of news. now british prime minister david cameron speaks at the they quit in london about economic and foreign policy. this will be -- speaks at the banquet about economic and foreign policy. this is about 40 minutes. >> the queen. ["god save the quee
, different manufacturers, serial numbers, version numbers, and as you well, all using personal computers, anti virus updates almost every day. vulnerability updates for microsoft if you are using a pc that are addressing boehner build is they discovered every couple days. they easily --vulnerabilities they discovered every couple days and patched up. it is very important you keep your start -- software and hardware up to current configuration c do not have any vulnerabilities. almost all of those agencies are reporting they are not doing that. segregation of duties -- this may not be the most important. this is the fox guarding the hen house. you have secured personnel responsible for security management. those should be different people than the people who have just general system administration functions. in general when you get into a very trusted organization many times this person could be one and the same. then you have contingency planning or disaster recovery. this deals with if something does happen, and a natural disaster or a man-made disaster or an attack, can you get back up
become the first sitting u.s. president to visit burma. he also visited thailand this weekend. today, cambodia, where he will attend a summit. in the meantime, back here in washington, congress takes a weeklong break for the thanksgiving holiday. they will come back as they ponder the fiscal cliff and how to avoid it this week. they will be back next week. lots more headlines and talk this weekend about the future of the republican party as it ponders itself. one headline says romney is digging a deeper hole for the party. we want to hear from republicans only for the first 45 minutes of its monday edition. what do you think the future of your party is, what do you stand for, and what should you stand for moving forward? here are the numbers -- ere's the "washington times" this morning, the governor of louisiana, bobby jindal. the talk continues in the party about what to romney has had to say about why he lost to the president. [video clip] >> first, governor romney is an honorable and exceptional man. i'm proud of campaign reform across the country, but i absolutely reject what he
. >> this week on "newsmakers," we want to welcome mary kay henry. we have two reporters to help us with this conversation today. lindsey cook, "national journ al." >> mary, you met with the president last week on these so- called fiscal cliff. what kind of assurances did you get from the president about his willingness to put entitlement cuts on the table in his negotiations? >> the president was crystal clear on his desire to get a conversation as a top priority before any cuts could be entertained. what we were pleased to hear, both community and labor leaders to work together in that meeting, was how completely clear the president was on respecting the will of the electorate from the november 6 election, where he believes he offered the nation a choice, and that the popular vote and the electoral vote said, yes, it is time for the wealthy americans to pay their fair share. >> did you get a sense that if he does get what he is asking for in revenue, he would be willing to entertain concessions on entitlements as well? he did do that last year with speaker boehner in the 2011 budg
could give us a quick reply. guest: the long-term future of the country will depend on a lot of things. the u.s. is taking a lot of steps right now to right the ship. labor may be one of them. taxation may be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this
threatened to stop that, he used all his tools of public service to help him win the battle. here are a couple of those tools he had, neil armstrong, tom stafford, part of a bipartisan coalition to put the united states on a path to go into orbit. as a boy who grew up within a mile and a half of the johnson space center, i saw ralph hall make history, that my kids, your kids, can see americans go into space. one more slide. we've all talked about the children earlier this year, because you did that, my kid said, dad, let's jump out of a plane when i turn 18. thank you, mr. chairman, you made a difference in my life and a difference to so many people. mr. smith: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from florida, bill posey. mr. posey: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the opportunity to join with me colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged bipartisan coalitions to support important legislation and no program, in my view, has benefited more if
extremely hopeful. i did not believe the republicans will allow us to go tubhe cliff. i hope that is true. it is such a simple problem to solve. we have had experience. we know. a couple of rounds with the speaker and obama. we had the judd gregg kent conrad. we know it. it has been doing something with actual tax revenues. mitt romney proved during the campaign you cannot do it just by doctoring up the tax code. that should be part of the deal. we need to have tax reform, we have to have the people that have done so well during the difficult time with the economy, the richest of the rich will have to pay a little bit more to solve the idea of the problems of the country. -- to solve the financial problems of this country. >> good afternoon, everyone. as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the president would be -- seems like our friends on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. i think we have a clear sense of the year to do something important for the country. we all know that the most critical st
to of ever been outbid by the public or are retiring. he is pushing for something like a bridge to get us past the fiscal cliff and into next year. 2013 will be the year for these big deals on entitlements, taxes, and spending. >> the president has invited the leaders to the white house. what else is happening in this coming week that people need to know about? >> the republicans will have their leadership elections. we are expecting that john boehner will remain the speaker and erick cantor will be the number two. there is not any major legislation on the floor of the house that we are expecting. >> the president is speaking again on wednesday on this and other issues. >> and using his post as the election pulpit to start the process. >> absolutely. >> a thank you for being here. an interesting couple weeks ahead for us to watch. >> tomorrow, roger daltrey and pete townshend of the who will talk about their program on childhood and young adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming
? that was the first thing i had to work out. the second is what we all know about. how did he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision now? what's the story about the atomic bomb before he became president and then when the decision was on his desk? it still a controversial story and i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency, looking at the life of harry truman in "citizen soldier" and i don "q&a." >> general less thandunford is currently the second highest rated officer in the marine corps and he is president obama's choice to lead the soldiers in afghanistan. committee chairman carl levin says he hopes to have a vote on the nomination shortly after the thanksgiving recess. german eleven and other committee members also expressed their support for current afghanistan commander john allen who is being investigated for allegedly misconduct relating to the scandal that forced the resignation of cia director david petraeus this is just over 2.5 hours. >> good morning, everybody. we are meeting to consider the nomintation of general joseph dunford, jr
>> tonight, anthony kennedy talks about preserving the u.s. constitution followed by the history of the presidential appointment process. anthony kennedy talks about protecting and preserving the u.s. constitution. from the heritage foundation, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it is great for me to be able to join john in welcoming new year to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture. the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity, and civil society flourished. to help achieve this vision, the center launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and -- inform citizens on topics related to this constitution. the series promotes the protection of individual liberties, property rights, free enterprise, constitutional limits on government. we've been able to feature some of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight'
the telecommunications industry was knee deep in this. they can -- in-line in us as to what went right. obviously all was not hunky dory. people lost power. is that something that could not be prevented? is this something if we changed might be prevented in the future? last summer a storm knocked out 911. these things are becoming more commonplace. a hearing would allow us to investigate the reliability of the networks and identify and highlight the best practices and addressed potential vulnerabilities in our communications infrastructure. obviously i want to hear what the industry has to say. we can help in light in congress as to what we should be doing to prevent this from happening in the future. >> representative engel, have you heard back from chairman upton? >> we have not. it was sent to chairman upton and the chairman of the telecommunications subcommittee. this proposed hearing is not to be adversarial. it should be bipartisan and we want to find out what happened. i do not think there is anyone who would not want to do that. i would take it one step further. i would like to see a separate
with five u.s. airlines including alaska, american, delta, united and u.s. airways, we anticipate the t.s.a. precheck will be in 35 airports by the end of the year with b.w.i., san francisco, and orlando airports all coming online this week. an additional airlines will be coming onboard >> all of this briefing in our c-span networks. we'll take you live to the white house for the briefing with jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thanks for being here. i have a brief statement to read at the top which is that today the president was able to continue returning messages of congratulations from his counterparts around the world. each call he thadged his counterpart for their friend -- thanked his counterpart for their friendship and expressed his desire for close cooperation moving ahead. the president spoke with president karzai of afghanistan, the prime minister of italy, the king of joshedian -- jordan, qatar, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering
a important. they want us to stay in the pacific without trying to drive us out. we are not containing them. we need to work on concrete areas where you work on issues of school and bilateral that build constituencies for both relationships. it helps to solve some problems and put into context for the public -- the respective publics the fact that we have human rights and other areas of cooperation to keep this relationship steady. i will finish by saying that we should not be overly optimistic or pessimistic. i will go back to that expert, mark twain. he says about music what i would say about the u.s.-china relationship. --said about wagner's music he was a great music critic. britney spears'spair not asand said, "it's good as it looks." [laughter] >> thank you. >> let me pick up on a point he made earlier. it is a complex idea. a great challenge that we face and might face is managing this relationship. in this context, i want to stress what i see as two of the major issues of challenge. first, the internal challenge. we tend to assume that china is growing at an% a year -- 10% per year,
were calling us directionless. and i walked away feeling inspired. that our generation does want to fix this country, does want to fix this world. and i don't know if it's going to happen overnight. i think our world is changing every day and i think the way we communicate, the way we effect change is going to be different than my father and my mother who grew up in the 60's. we're not out there in the streets protesting. i think we communicate and spread information in a much different way. >> so where did you grow up? >> i grew up -- i was born in d.c. i grew up in connecticut, went to school in new hampshire. >> what was the atmosphere of your family? what did your parents do? >> my mother was a journalist actually. she was a science writer. she wrote for the "washington post." >> was -- >> christine russell. she kept her maiden name. my dad is a lawyer. he started in the public sector. and then ended his career for 20 years working for general electric. and now teaches up in boston. >> this is the well-known ben hineman. wasn't his father also well known? >> yes. >> explain that. ac
. today we have over 60 house democratic women. [applause] not enough. we want more. but all of us who were there, that dozen of us for the time, we took responsibility to try to put more women in congress across the country. i am proud that in california our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators. women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our members are great here, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator elect tammy baldwin [applause] senator elect mazie hirono. only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. that is very exciting. unfortunately we do not have kathy hochul this next congress, but the future is soon coming upon -- we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. we are still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success -- as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states? the house democratic women? because this is where the hopes and d
that question -- the roles of our committee are you cannot use something that you learned in a classified session. i can give you my assessment based on questions, my investigation, that what susan rice did was use talking points, pulled out originally by the cia signed off by the intelligence community, those were requested by the house committee. the intelligence committee sign off of it. the key was there were unclassified talking points at an early stage. i do not think she should be pelerine for this. she did what i would have done or anybody else would have done that was going on a weekend show. you would have said what talking points can i use? you get an unclassified version. i just remember -- i just read it to the committee what i was going to tell you and questions asked. to be sure it did not violate our rules. this particularly is for people in public office because you are used to answering questions candidly to have to be restricted to what is unclassified. is very difficult for your >> did he talk about his resignation? >> [indiscernible] >> i think it is making a very div
. what it meant was that if the government was hoping to collect more from us than it is going to spend -- that is, the government is going to run a surplus. the rest of the world is going to take more from us than it is going to spend buying our goods and services. that drives the domestic private-sector, us, into deficit. it has to. it adds up exactly. if you have a 4.5% trade deficit and a 1% budget surplus, the private-sector is going to be in deficit 5.5%. the only way you keep the private sector in the red, above zero, is if the government deficit is big enough to more than offset the trade deficit. if the u.s. is running trade deficits on the order of 4.5% of gdp, the government deficit has to be at least 4.5% of gdp, or the private sector will fall below zero. every single time. here is the cbo forecast. this is what is projected to happen to the government deficit if we hit the cliff. this is the alternative scenario. if we hit the cliff, the projection is that the government deficit will shrink to around 2% of gdp. deficits of 2% of gdp, together with trade deficits of 4.5%, i
next few years. host: founder and executive editor of the hagstrom report. thank you for joining us this morning. hohost: let's look at one last story. the former senator died overnight according to union leader.com. he had been ill for a considerable time and was instrumental in the appointment by president george h. w. bush by david sutter. before his retirement, he was associated with the law firm in new hampshire. the story points out that he was born back in 1930 and served in the united states senate from 1980 until 1993. he was asked to replace the treasury secretary by president clinton but he declined. that headline from the new hampshire a union leader. we will see you tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. here on the washington journal. until then, have a good day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ♪ >> here is what is coming up on the c-span network. live at noon on c-span, a discussion on the challenges in the middle east and united states foreign policy. speakers at the woodrow wilson center in could robe
in satellite trucks to use satellite to back call the information, -- back haul the information, using generators, using batteries to keep the network up and running. >> about emergency communications? >> from our perspective, the public safety ports, very few of them went down. they had a nice backup power in place. they were consolidated. we saw that 911 worked well. the mayor's office in new york city talked about, use text in were of you can. leave the phone calls to 911, the really important calls. otherwise use text in order data connections to gather information. >> did it get flooded with information? >> usage was pretty tremendous. whenever you have an issue where there is a lot of people who need information, you find that the networks get flooded. i saw the numbers up to 15,000% increase on some websites. in a lot of the applications stores, the apps that ran to the top or ones that give access information, or the mobil flashlight. -- mobile flashlight. there was a surge in traffic, but i did not see numbers that suggested there was a significant amount of call blocking or d
. in naples us to perform registry's in order to collect data. -- it enables us to perform registry's in order to collect data. >> is team cancer more prevalent in europe than in the usa? >> it is very difficult to get numbers from the west. in britain every day there are six teenagers who get the bad news. and based on our figures in using your population, it would be about 30 per day, 30 families per day that are going through hell. notour system there's anything like a teenager. there are children, and after the age of 12, they are adults. when you ask about if we will do any research, it is the fact that we have a group that you can study, and then you would focus the madison. you will learn more about the cancers. and america, they do not exist. your numbers are all heaped together. apparently at the moment there are 70,000 per year it must be 30. >> is it easier to do clinical trials on teenagers and young children? are the ethical issues lower? >> i believe it is more difficult to give -- to do the research. they tend to be underinsured. they tend to sometimes have no insurance. love it
to stop it? the answer is no, we should not. one of britain's great u.s. piece, one of our great sales proposition is our openness and this openness is a vital part of our modern industrial strategy. the fact that we are such an open economy is a calling card for britain all over the world and internationally recognized. foreign investment creates jobs and wealth and growth. and far from weakening our base the investment actually strengthens it. look at our car industry. japanese investment. foreign investment is positively beneficial for british jobs in manufacturing and for the reba lansing of our economy that is so essential. and there is a similarly positive story on trade too. more free trade will mean more growth that's why i'm determined to leading new international trade agreements that will benefit britain inincluding e.u. deals with the u.s. and japan in the next year. free trade in in our d.n.a. and with all the institutions and legal expertise here in london, we're not just a great country to trade with, we can also be a country of choice for others to trade in creating yet
as hard as anyone to carry us across the finish line. [applause] her love and support kept me going at times when i thought the odds were insurmountable. gail and i have never ever felt so much pride when we introduced and worked with our daughter is so thank you. [applause] as you know, many of my family and friends are here. i want to thank my mom, judy. [applause] my sister leann, my sister robyn, and my brother bruce and my extended family. i want to thank them all. one thing that is a little bit different is my dad is not here. he has been in very bad health. he has been struggling and i am not sure what will happen. he is right here with me and i want to say i love him and thank him for his support. [applause] listen -- first of all, i am psyched that you guys hung around. [laughter] [applause] [go, scott, go] many of you know in your lives, there is a point in your life, when you take on a challenge and you do something that no one ever thought you could achieve and you do the very best you possibly could and you leave everything on the table whether you are in a sporting eve
comes to grips with the major problems facing us. >> i am open to compromise and new ideas. i am committed to liking ideas. i refuse to accept any approach that is not balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay one dime more in taxes. " the current congress has work to do in what is referred to as a lame duck session. work is pending on the fiscal clef. planned cuts to domestic and military spending, also known as sequestration. follow the debates starting to o'clock eastern with live coverage on c-span and the senate on c-span 2. >> my favorite program is "book tv." i also like the coverage of the book fares on "book tv." they will occasionally cover lectures from historians, universities, but fares. i find it very informative. allied the diversity of the coverage. i learned about topics that i may be would not encounter on my browsing the internet of the sites ago to. to.c-- the sites i go we sat there and watched it and learned a lot a about the characteri
in the national interest to clear out the mess that labor left us, particularly in driving unemployment down, let me just pick one constituent city, in corby, it went down 4.6% last month. >> for the first time in my parliamentary career, i wholeheartedly agree with him. let's just savor and treasure this moment. because i suspect it will be very, very rare, indeed. but i like it when i heard the honorable member had been sent to a jungle to eat insects, i thought despite the appearance of civility from my new chief whip this indicated a new disciplinaryian approach in our whip's office and i totally agree with him we are doing a great job together to fix the economy and great jobs for people in the future and that's a great shared endeavor. >> you've been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. question time airs live on c-span 2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern when the house of commons is in session, and again on sunday nights at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span. next week, members are out for a short autumn re-recess. question time returns on wednesda
to train. specialist nelson is just one of 60 -- 60 u.s. service members who have been killed this year by the afghans that they were sent to train. i don't know where the outrage is by the united states congress. i am very disappointed in both parties, their leadership to allow our young men and women to stay in a war that has no end to it, makes no sense to the american people. in fact, mr. speaker, the american people have said time after time, poll after poll that they want to bring our troops home now, not 2014 but now. on october 7, there was a national article written and the title was "a mother mourns a grim milestone," referring to the 2,000 american casualties from the afghan war. lisa freeman, who was interviewed in the article, who lost her son, captain matthew freeman, in 2009, he was shot by a sniper in afghanistan, ms. freeman said, i just sat here reliving the pain and wondering , where is america's outrage? where is america's concern that we're still at war? and mr. speaker, i made reference to this yesterday. the october 14 "new york times" editorial, and the title, "t
enforcement, along with the u.s. customs and border protection, as well as federal and local and foreign law enforcement has created this initiative. the first best initiative was created in laredo back in 2005. and it's become a model across the country. and this is a comprehensive approach to identify, disrupt, dismantle transnational criminal organizations that have posed significant threats to the border and maritime security. through investigations, seize years of contra-- seizures of contraband, they are building success. there are 48 units throughout the united states. they work not only with the mexican counterparts but with the canadian counterparts. certainly we want to make sure that congress provides the best support to the best units in order to enhance border security and of course the communities that we have -- that we all represent. so, again, members, i would ask that you all work and support this bill and today, a very appropriate time, we had the new president-elect of mexico that came down here, met with members of congress and i believe at this particular time he's meet
>> the final seconds just to say thank you very much for spending time with us. a very much appreciated. thank you. >> thank you. >> we have completed our four weeks of special debate editions. you will see the first district congressional candidates in their only televised debate this year. republic and ben lange and democrat bruce braley. live from dubuque. we will show it at our usual press times and again on sunday. thanks for joining us today. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> that was republican congressman steve king and democratic challenger christie bill suck debating on iowa public television last week for lsack debating and iowa public television last week for the fourth district. in a moment we will take your phone calls and street and get your opinions. here are the phone lines to weigh in on tuesday's election. ou can also send us a tweakeet using the hash tags c-span 2012. tonight at 8:25 p.m. eastern, republican presidential candidate mitt romney and his wife will be
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 251 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)